Execution Plan Compile Termination

July 17, 2009 at 7:22 am (SQL Server 2005, SQL Server 2008, SQLServerPedia Syndication, TSQL) (, , , , , )

Recently I’ve been seeing a lot of people with bad execution plans, desperately trying to tune them, but they were unable to explain why they had such bad plans. More often than no these were larger queries, with a number of derived tables, CTE’s, CROSS APPLY, etc. In most cases the statistics appeared to be fine (this is usually checked by comparing estimated & actual rows within the operations in the execution plan) and the plans themselves didn’t look crazy, but the execution plans were flat out, not good.

If you’re looking at a plan and it doesn’t make much sense, one option that most people don’t check… SQL Server didn’t have enough time to complete optimization. The optimizer is a pretty amazing bit of code. The scary volume of work it does in frightenly short periods of time is quite awesome. However, it doesn’t always get done. To quickly check this situation you need to determine the “Reason For Early Termination¬†Of Statement Optimization.” In the graphical execution plans this is found by going to the final operator in the plan, usually an INSERT, UPDATE, DELETE, or SELECT operator. Most people know to hover the mouse over the operator & get interesting little facts, but most people forget about checking the properties. Right click on this, or any other operator, and select Properties from the context menu. This will open the properties window, which looks something¬†like this:

Properties

Right near the bottom you can see that this execution plan is showing an early termination reason of “Time Out.” That means that the optimizer didn’t finish optimizing. When the optimizer is running, it tries a whole series of different joins, join order, filters, what have you, all through some mathematic process that I’m not even remotely qualified to describe. But if it runs out of time, it goes with the last one it had. The last one it had might be the worst possible plan for this query, but because it hit a time out…

You can also find this right in the XML for the execution plan. In the Batch/Statements/StmtSimple property find the @StatementOptmEarlyAbortReason. It will show the same thing, “Time Out,” when the optimizer has run out of time.

You can get other early abort reasons, but the best one is “GoodEnoughPlanFound.” That means that the optimizer was able to complete it’s job. That doesn’t mean you have a good plan, but it means that you don’t have some interim pile of junk that is doing you more harm than good.

What can you do to fix this? Write simpler queries.

OK. Maybe that’s not helpful. Try to simplify the query. You may not be able to. If not, you might try rearranging the query, changing the join order. Yes, as everyone says, join order doesn’t matter, but the full statement is “Join order doesn’t normally matter.” Sometimes it can make a real difference. You may also have to supply some query hints, join hints, etc., to try to nudge the optimizer along.

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