Switching Off Parameter Sniffing

November 15, 2010 at 8:00 am (SQL Server 2008, SQLServerPedia Syndication, TSQL) (, , , )

Or, another way to put it, in most cases, shooting yourself in the foot.

I was not aware that the cumulative update for SQL Server 2008 back in June included a switch that allows you to turn parameter sniffing off within SQL Server. Thanks to Kendra Little (blog|twitter) for letting me know about it (although she let me know by “stumping the chump” during my lightening talk at the Summit, thanks Kendra!).

When I first saw the switch, I thought about the places where turning off parameter sniffing could be helpful. But, as I thought about it, the more I realized that removing parameter sniffing was an extremely dangerous switch. Why? Because, most people only ever hear about parameter sniffing when they run into a problem. Someone says “Parameter sniffing” and you see people cringe. Too many people will take this information in and go, “Hey, I can just switch parameter sniffing off and I’ll have a much faster system, all the time.” But… even when you’re not hitting a problem with parameter sniffing, you’re still getting parameter sniffing. Here is where I see a problem. Let’s discuss what parameter sniffing is.

Parameter sniffing is applicable to stored procedures and parameterized queries. What happens is, when a value is passed to a parameter, the optimizer has the ability to read, or “sniff,” the value of that parameter. It can do this because it knows exactly what the value is when the proc/query is called. This is not applicable to local variables, because the optimizer can’t really know what those values might be, where as it knows exactly what the values of parameters are going in. Why does it do this? One word: statistics. Statistics are what the optimizer uses to determine how queries will be executed. If the optimizer is given a specific value, it can then compare that value to the statistics on the index or table in question and get as good an answer as is possible from those statistics as to how selective this value may be. That information determines how the optimizer will run the query and because it is using specific values, it’s looking at specific information within the stats. If the parameters are not sniffed, the statistics are sampled and a generic value is assumed, which can result in a different execution plan.

The problem with parameter sniffing occurs when you have out of date statistics or data skew (certain values which return a wildly different set of results compared to the rest of the data within the table). The bad statistics or skew can result in an execution plan that is not consistent with most of the data that the stats represent. However, most of the time, in most situations, this is an edge case. Notice that hedging though. When parameter sniffing goes bad, it hurts.

Most of the time we’re going to gain huge benefits from parameter sniffing because the use of specific values leads to more accurate, not less accurate, execution plans. Sampled data, basically an average of the data in the statistics, can lead to a more stable execution plan, but a much less accurate one. Switching parameter sniffing off means that all queries will use sampled data, which creates a serious negative impact on performance. Most of the time, most of us are benefitting wildly from the strengths of parameter sniffing and only occasionally are we seeing the problems.

Unless you know, and I mean know, not suspect, that your system has major and systematic issues with parameter sniffing, leave this switch alone and let the optimizer make these choices for you. If you don’t, it’s very likely that you’ll see a performance hit on your system.

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Parameter Name Size And Performance

September 27, 2010 at 8:00 am (SQL Server 2005, SQL Server 2008, SQLServerPedia Syndication, TSQL) (, , , , , )

I saw an odd statement the other day, “The size of the name of the parameter does not affect performance.” My first thought was, “Well, duh!” But then, I had one of those, “Ah, but are you sure” thoughts. And you know what, I wasn’t sure.

If size of the parameter name did affect performance, I figured, the one sure place where that would be evident is in the size of the execution plan. Right? I mean, if there was an impact on memory, and hence on performance, that’s probably where you’d see evidence of it. I wrote two queries:

 DECLARE @ThisIsAVeryVeryLongParameterNameThatIsTrulyRidiculousButItIllustratesThePointThatParameterLengthDoesNotAffectPerformance int
SET @ThisIsAVeryVeryLongParameterNameThatIsTrulyRidiculousButItIllustratesThePointThatParameterLengthDoesNotAffectPerformance = 572
SELECT soh.SalesOrderID
,sod.SalesOrderDetailID
FROM Sales.SalesOrderHeader AS soh
JOIN Sales.SalesOrderDetail AS sod
ON soh.SalesOrderID = sod.SalesOrderID
WHERE soh.SalesOrderID = @ThisIsAVeryVeryLongParameterNameThatIsTrulyRidiculousButItIllustratesThePointThatParameterLengthDoesNotAffectPerformance

DECLARE @v int
SET @v = 572
SELECT soh.SalesOrderID
,sod.SalesOrderDetailID
FROM Sales.SalesOrderHeader AS soh
JOIN Sales.SalesOrderDetail AS sod
ON soh.SalesOrderID = sod.SalesOrderID
WHERE soh.SalesOrderID = @v 

If you run this against AdventureWorks2008R2 you’ll get two distinct, but identical, execution plans:

You can see that they look identical, but how do I know they’re distinct? If you run this query:

 SELECT deqs.creation_time,
deqs.query_hash,
deqs.query_plan_hash
FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats AS deqs
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(deqs.plan_handle) AS deqp
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(deqs.sql_handle) AS dest
WHERE dest.text LIKE '%SELECT soh.SalesOrderID%' 

You’ll get this back as a result:

creation_time                               query_hash                                 query_plan_hash
2010-09-23 18:18:09.347      0x8D0FB9D524B8DD4D       0x13707445560737BA
2010-09-23 18:18:16.223       0x8D0FB9D524B8DD4D       0x13707445560737BA

Two distinct queries, but with identical hash values, so the plans generated are nearly the same, but clearly different, due to the fact that they were built with different parameters, including the monster name. So, how to see if there is a difference in the plan generated that could affect performance? How about the execution plan properties. First, the property sheet for the SELECT operator for the query with the long parameter name:

Of particular note is the Cache Plan Size. Let’s compare it to the same property sheet for the small parameter name:

If you compare the two, you’ll see that they’re the same. In fact, if you look at almost all the values, you’ll see that the Compile CPU, Compile Memory, and Compile Time are all identical. Based on all this information, I have to conclude that no, the size of the name of the parameter doesn’t affect performance, positively or negatively. But why?

I’m actually not 100% sure, but based on some things I know, here’s what I think. The Algebrizer within the Query Optimizer breaks down all the objects referred to within a query plan. It assigns them all values and identifiers for that plan, part of getting the information together to feed the plan into the mathematical part of the Optimizer. I’ll bet it just assigns values to parameters that are the same type of value, if not the same exact value, and that value is the same size from one execution plan to the next.

This means that you don’t save memory by assigning parameters @a, @b, @c when in fact you mean @ReferenceCount, @MaxRetries, @BeginDate. Do I think you should put in parameters of the silly length I put in before? No, of course, not, because it makes the TSQL code less clear. But, so does putting in equally silly, short, parameter names.

Don’t make your TSQL code hard to read. It doesn’t help performance.

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